The Wittenberg Trail

Calvinism, Arminian and Lutheran Beliefs Compared Chart

I'm wondering if anyone knows of an online chart that would compare Calvinism, Areminian and Lutheran beliefs.  I'm looking for something brief and easy to print out.

 

Thanks for any help you can offer in this regard.

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I've attached a file I put together way back on my vicarage. I've done some tweaking here and there since. My original is formatted in OpenOffice, so this Word Document version might look a little funny. It might be what you're looking for, or be at least the beginnings of what you're looking for.
Calvinism has summarized its position in the famous acronym TULIP, and this serves as a useful way to approach the issue (being logical Calvinism is, if nothing else, easy to follow):

T: "total depravity"
Calvinism: Man after the Fall has no ability to cooperate with God's grace in conversion
Arminianism: Man after the Fall can cooperate with God’s grace in conversion
Lutheranism: Agrees with Calvinism on total depravity
Relevant Bible passages: Romans 3:9-20; Gal. 3:22

U: "unconditional election"
Calvinism: Before the world was created, God unconditionally elected some (the elect) for salvation and the others (reprobates) for damnation.
Arminianism: Before the world was created, God foresaw those who would choose Him of their own free will and elected them to salvation
Lutheranism: Before the world was created, God unconditionally elected some (the elect) for salvation but did not reprobate (chose for damnation) any.
Relevant Bible passages: Romans 9:11-13; 1 Timothy 2:3-4; 2 Cor. 5:14-15; Mat. 25:34, 41.

L: "limited atonement"
Calvinism: Jesus only died for the elect, objectively atoning for their sin, but he did not die for the sins of the reprobates.
Arminianism: Christ died to give all the possibility to be saved.
Lutheranism: Christ’s death objectively atoned for all the sin of the world; by believing we receive this objective atonement and its benefits.
Relevant Bible passages: John 1:29; 1 John 2:2; 2 Cor. 5:14-15, 19.

I: "irresistable grace"
Calvinism: In all of God's outward actions (preaching, baptism, etc.) there is an outward call which all receive, yet there is also a secret effectual calling which God gives to the elect alone. This effectual calling alone saves and is irresistable.
Arminianism: God gives in His outward actions the same grace to all; this grace can be resisted by all.
Lutheranism: The question is not answerable; for the elect, grace will irresistably triumph, yet those who reject Christ have rejected that Grace; yet the grace is the same.
Relevant Bible passages: Eph. 2:1-10; Acts 13:48; James 1:13-15

P: "perseverance of the saints" (sort of like "once saved, always saved.")
Calvinism: Salvation cannot be lost. Those who have truly put their faith in Christ may temporarily lose the evidence of their faith and even live for a time in grave and unrepentant sin, without losing their salvation.
Arminianism: Salvation can be lost through unrepentant sin and unbelief.
Lutheranism: Salvation can be lost through mortal sin and unbelief, but this legal warning does not cancel the Gospel promise of election
Relevant Bible passages: 1 Cor. 10:12. 2 Peter 2:1, 20-22.

Originally posted at Here We Stand
Thanks, James.
Someone was just asking about this at the last Bible Study.
-Rik.

James Robertson said:
Calvinism has summarized its position in the famous acronym TULIP, and this serves as a useful way to approach the issue (being logical Calvinism is, if nothing else, easy to follow):

1 Cor. 10:12. 2 Peter 2:1, 20-22.

Originally posted at Here We Stand
Absolutely a great question Paula! I hope someone has an answer for you, because this has been something I've wanted cleared up as well. In what primary issues do we have common ground? What absolutely seperates us? What are causes of differing opinions but are really just secondary issues that don't preclude common unity in Christ?
Pastor Wagner, didn't the 5 Articles of Remonstance (Arminian) happen first in 1610 before the Synod of Dordt? Your chart makes it seem the other way around.
Thank you so much Pastor Wagner and James. These are very helpful!

We are studying predestination in our Wednesday night Bible Study class and these are excellent resources to help me wrap my brain around the subject.

One of the topics for next week deals with the "once saved, always saved" theory.
Tom Jennings said:
Pastor Wagner, didn't the 5 Articles of Remonstance (Arminian) happen first in 1610 before the Synod of Dordt? Your chart makes it seem the other way around.

Yes, you are correct. Good catch, I can only think I wrote what I did because of the definition of the term remonstrance. The Canon of Dort was a response to the Five Points of Remonstrance. Thank you for pointing out my error; I have corrected it.

Uploaded once again:
Attachments:
I downloaded this to read later. I'm sure I'll find it helpful on one mothering discussion board I'm on. Most of the women are from the Calvinist background. Most of the conversations are about parenting, but some are on religious topics and it helps to have a reference point.

Rev. Geoffrey A. Wagner said:
Tom Jennings said:
Pastor Wagner, didn't the 5 Articles of Remonstance (Arminian) happen first in 1610 before the Synod of Dordt? Your chart makes it seem the other way around.

Yes, you are correct. Good catch, I can only think I wrote what I did because of the definition of the term remonstrance. The Canon of Dort was a response to the Five Points of Remonstrance. Thank you for pointing out my error; I have corrected it.

Uploaded once again:
Thank you, Pastor Wagner and James for this concise summary of the Calvinist, Arminian and Lutheran teachings. Thanks to Paula, as well, for asking the question.
While the chart addresses the 5 points of Calvinism, it doesn't address other issues that Lutherans view as important, e.g., the Sacraments. As I understand it, both Calvinists and Arminians generally have a much lower view of the Sacraments.
Yes, a lower view. In my pre-Lutheran experience (Baptist, Calvinistic Baptist, low church Anglican), the Lord's Supper was seen as a solemn memorial -- sometimes with deep introspection, sorrowness for one's sin and thankfulness for God's grace in Christ -- but not really a means of grace. It was more of "this is what you do to remember" than "this is what the sacrament is or does". But it was handled with reference and even the most fundy of Baptist ministers took care to use the Words of Institution.

Baptism was treated as profession and initiation. If infants were baptized, the practice and belief varied greatly from a mere dedication to a formal entry to the covenant community to the Anglican service that has the language of regeneration -- with equally varied understandings about original sin, how children come to faith, and where they find assurance. These pastors did all care about using the trinitarian formula.

Lutheran teaching has greater clarity in explaining the means of grace and tying them to forgiveness, life and salvation.

SR Battles said:
While the chart addresses the 5 points of Calvinism, it doesn't address other issues that Lutherans view as important, e.g., the Sacraments. As I understand it, both Calvinists and Arminians generally have a much lower view of the Sacraments.

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