The Wittenberg Trail

Hello.  Wow....this is one very inactive Wittenberg Trail group!  I am just wondering if anyone else uses Classical Conversations as their home schooling curriculum.  We have been using SOS (switched on schoolhouse) and it has been pretty good, but we miss the interaction of Classical Conversations, and the classical method in utilizes.  Just wanted to get opinions about CC and/or other Lutheran homeschooling family's curricula.

Tags: Classical, Conversations, home, homeschool, school

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I was home schooled through high school and plan on home schooling my own kids (all three and under right now). I, too, am interested in what other Lutherans are choosing for curricula, especially the classical sort. I tutor the 7th grade class (Challenge A) at our local CC group. I think CC is a wonderful program to help introduce the classical model AND homeschooling to newbie (and some veteran) parents. It also helps keeps parents accountable and organized, if that is a weakness.

However, I'm not sure if we will use it for our kids. It would be a big sacrifice for our family to pay the tuition for the lower elementary levels (say, ages 4-7); I think at that age it amounts to an expensive play day. At the older junior high and high school levels I have some issues with some of the texts (This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti, Born Again by Chuck Colson---with only so many books to read in four years why these? Is this really the best in Christian literature?)

I like a lot of what I see in Memoria Press, and will probably loosely use their early elementary curriculum. I like Veritas Press, too (CC uses a lot of their stuff). While all three are classical, they each have their bias (mainstream evangelical, Roman Catholic, Reformed).

I'll be interested to hear suggestions/opinions from other Lutherans. What do you like/dislike about SOS, Paul?

SOS has been very convenient.  My oldest boy, 9 years old, likes to sit down and do all his homework at the computer.  So, that's a plus.  The vast majority of homework is automatically graded, which frees up a lot of my wife's time, another plus.  However, my oldest boy also has a great memory, and can very easily learn on his own.  I don't know if the rest of my children will be like that.  Plus, SOS is not really a Classical method.  It keeps up with what is going on in public schools, and doesn't require deep thought, there is no Latin, and memorization of facts is pretty much missing.  That is a short summary of what I think about SOS.  Thanks for the insight into the CC books.  You make a good point about being very selective about what books the children should be reading during this time. 


Paul
Katy Hopkins said:

I was home schooled through high school and plan on home schooling my own kids (all three and under right now). I, too, am interested in what other Lutherans are choosing for curricula, especially the classical sort. I tutor the 7th grade class (Challenge A) at our local CC group. I think CC is a wonderful program to help introduce the classical model AND homeschooling to newbie (and some veteran) parents. It also helps keeps parents accountable and organized, if that is a weakness.

However, I'm not sure if we will use it for our kids. It would be a big sacrifice for our family to pay the tuition for the lower elementary levels (say, ages 4-7); I think at that age it amounts to an expensive play day. At the older junior high and high school levels I have some issues with some of the texts (This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti, Born Again by Chuck Colson---with only so many books to read in four years why these? Is this really the best in Christian literature?)

I like a lot of what I see in Memoria Press, and will probably loosely use their early elementary curriculum. I like Veritas Press, too (CC uses a lot of their stuff). While all three are classical, they each have their bias (mainstream evangelical, Roman Catholic, Reformed).

I'll be interested to hear suggestions/opinions from other Lutherans. What do you like/dislike about SOS, Paul?
I have used The Well-Trained Mind, loosely, for 8 years.  I have not used Latin, which I sometimes regret, because I already know Spanish.  I really like the Story of the World for history, and many of their other curriculum suggestions.  I don't follow their science suggestions, however.  We use Apologia for science.  I do not follow the daily schedule laid out in the books, because it is too heavy of a load for us.  So I take their ideas and fit it into the time I want us to spend on formal school.  I haven't been as faithful with the memory work as I would like to be, but we have done some.  I have a friend who uses CC.  Not sure if I would want the stress of having to keep up with that rigorous of a schedule.  I am thankful that my kids are getting good education along with learning Lutheran theology in the home. 
We are in our second year with Classical Conversations and we love it.  At the elementary age, you would still need a math program and maybe language arts.  We do Foundations and Essentials (the language arts afternoon program).  I cannot say enough good things about CC.  I tutor both Foundation and Essentials so I am pretty familiar with the ins and outs of the program.  CC has really transformed our homeschool.  My kids enjoy the memory work, and love the Friday classes.  We are in it for the long haul.  If you have specific questions I would be glad to answer them.  I would say though that it is well worth the investment!

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